How Does a Trustee Transfer Property to a Beneficiary When the Settlor Dies?

01/27/2011 - Trusts - State: FL #24091

Full Question:

I am the named trustee for a friend who passed away last November. How do I get the settler's daughter's name on the deed to the house? The daughter is the named beneficiary.

Answer:

A property held in trust may be distributed to a beneficiary by means of a trustee's or fiduciary deed. A deed is the written document which transfers title (ownership) or an interest in real property to another person. The deed must describe the real property, name the party transferring the property (grantor), the party receiving the property (grantee) and be signed and notarized by the grantor. In addition to the signature of the grantor(s), deeds must be acknowledged to be recorded and acceptable as evidence of ownership without other proof. A valid deed must be delivered and accepted to be an effective conveyance. Most states assume delivery if the grantee is in possession of the deed. The deed also must be accepted by the grantee. This acceptance does not need to be shown in any formal way, but rather may be by any act, conduct or words showing an intention to accept such as recording the deed. To complete the transfer (conveyance) the deed must be recorded in the office of the county recorder or recorder of deeds in the county in which the real estate is located. There are two basic types of deeds: a warranty deed, which guarantees that the grantor owns title, and the quitclaim deed, which transfers only that interest in the real property which the grantor actually has. The only type of deed that creates "liability by reason of covenants of warranty" as to matters of record is a general warranty deed. A quit claim deed contains no warranties and the seller doesn't have liability to the buyer for other recorded claims on the property. The purchaser takes the property subject to existing taxes, assessments, liens, encumbrances, covenants, conditions, restrictions, rights of way and easements of record. However, a person who obtains a mortgage is still liable for mortgage payments after executing a quit claim deed on the property securing the mortgage. The quitclaim is often used among family members or from one joint owner to the other when there is little question about existing ownership, or just to clear the title.

Please see the information at the following links: http://definitions.uslegal.com/r/real-estate-deeds/ http://definitions.uslegal.com/w/warranty-deed/ http://definitions.uslegal.com/q/quit-claim-deed/ http://definitions.uslegal.com/t/trustees-deed/ http://definitions.uslegal.com/f/fiduciary-deed/ Please see the forms at the following links: http://www.uslegalforms.com/fl/FL-ED1001-AA.htm http://www.uslegalforms.com/fl/FL-SDEED-6.htm http://www.uslegalforms.com/deedforms/florida-deed-forms.htm

01/27/2011 - Category: Trusts - State: FL #24091

See more Questions in the Trusts Category