Is there any law that requires a parent to support their minor child in Kentucky?

Full Question:

My brother passed away 3 years ago and his widow has a daughter who turned 7 years in Kentucky. My sister-in-law is not providing any support for her daughter after my brother's death even though there is a support Order in place by the Court. She is a working woman, but her daughter is always depending on me, her aunt, for her needs. What will the punishment for my sister-in-law who refuses to provide support for her daughter?
03/08/2017   |   Category: Minors ยป Support   |   State: Kentucky   |   #33575

Answer:

In Kentucky, your sister-in-law is guilty of nonsupport. Since, she persistently failed to provide support to her daughter, which she can reasonably provide and which she knows he has a duty to provide, she has committed the offence of nonsupport which is a Class A misdemeanor. She may be sentenced to a definite term of imprisonment up to 1 year or a fine of $ 500 or both.

KRS § 530.050 reads:
 
“(1) A person is guilty of nonsupport:
 
     (a) When he persistently fails to provide support which he can reasonably provide and which he knows he has a duty to provide to a minor or to a child adjudged mentally disabled, indigent spouse or indigent parent; or
 
     (b) Upon a finding that a defendant obligor, subject to court order to pay any amount for the support of a minor child, is delinquent in meeting the full obligation established by such order and has been so delinquent for a period of at least two (2) months duration.
 
(2) A person is guilty of flagrant nonsupport when he persistently fails to provide support which he can reasonably provide and which he knows he has a duty to provide by virtue of a court or administrative order to a minor or to a child adjudged mentally disabled, indigent spouse or indigent parent and the failure results in:
 
     (a) An arrearage of not less than one thousand dollars ($ 1,000); or
 
     (b) Six (6) consecutive months without payment of support; or
 
     (c) The dependent having been placed in destitute circumstances. For the purposes of this paragraph, it shall be prima facie evidence that a dependent has been placed in destitute circumstances if the dependent is a recipient of public assistance as defined in KRS 205.010.
 
(3) A person has a duty to provide support for an indigent spouse, a minor child or children, or a child or children adjudged mentally disabled and, for purposes of this section, is presumed to know of that duty.
 
(4) Any person who is eighteen (18) years of age or over, residing in this state and having in this state a parent who is destitute of means of subsistence and unable because of old age, infirmity, or illness to support himself or herself, has a duty to provide support for such parent and, for purposes of this section, is presumed to know of that duty.
 
(5) Nonsupport is a Class A misdemeanor. For a second offense, the person shall receive a minimum sentence of seven (7) days in jail. For a third or any subsequent offense, the person shall receive a minimum sentence of thirty (30) days in jail.
 
(6) Flagrant nonsupport is a Class D felony.”
 
KRS § 532.020 reads:
 
“***
(2) Any offense defined outside this code for which a law outside this code provides a sentence to a definite term of imprisonment with a maximum which falls between ninety (90) days and twelve (12) months shall be deemed a Class A misdemeanor.”
 
KRS § 534.040 reads:
 
“(1) Fines and imprisonment for misdemeanors shall not be mutually exclusive. In any case where imprisonment is authorized, a fine may be levied in addition to the imprisonment, or a fine may be levied as an alternative to imprisonment. Similarly, a fine may be levied in lieu of imprisonment. Whether the fine is to be levied as the sole penalty or as an additional or alternative penalty shall be in the discretion of the judge or jury as the case may be. If the trial is by jury, the jury shall have the discretion. This rule shall apply in all cases where a fine is not the exclusive penalty authorized by law.
 
(2) Except as otherwise provided for an offense defined outside this code, a person who has been convicted of any offense other than a felony shall be sentenced, in addition to any other punishment imposed upon him, to pay a fine in an amount not to exceed:
 
     (a) For a Class A misdemeanor, five hundred dollars ($ 500) . . ..”