What is the punishment for not providing child support in Massachusetts?

Full Question:

What is the punishment for a parent who intentionally leaves his child and goes to another state so that he can avoid paying child support? Need to know Massachusetts law.
03/21/2017   |   Category: Minors ยป Support   |   State: Massachusetts   |   #34328

Answer:

Massachusetts has some law on child nonsupport or criminal nonsupport.
If a person leaves his child and goes to another state without making proper arrangements for the care and support of the minor child or spouse or both of them then such a person is guilty of a felony.
Such a person may have to than two and one-half years to ten years of imprisonment. In addition or alternatively, such person may have to pay a fine of 10000 dollars.More details on child nonsupport and the punishment for such offense are stated below.
 
ALM GL ch. 273, § 1  :
Child and Spouse.
A spouse or parent shall be guilty of a felony and shall be subject to the penalties set forth in section fifteen A if:
     (1) he abandons his spouse or minor child without making reasonable provisions for the support of his spouse or minor child or both of them; or
     (2) he leaves the commonwealth and goes into another state without making reasonable provisions for the support of his spouse or minor child or both of them; or
     (3) he enters the commonwealth from another state without making reasonable provisions for the support of his spouse or minor child, or both of them, domiciled in another state; or
     (4) wilfully and while having the financial ability or earning capacity to have complied, he fails to comply with an order or judgment for support which has been entered pursuant to chapter one hundred and nineteen, two hundred and seven, two hundred and eight, two hundred and nine, two hundred and nine C, or two hundred and seventy-three, or received, entered or registered pursuant to chapter two hundred and nine D, or entered pursuant to similar laws of other states. No civil proceeding in any court shall be held to be a bar to a prosecution hereunder but the court shall not enter any order pursuant to section fifteen A which would directly or indirectly result in a decrease in the amount paid for current support pursuant to an order or judgment on behalf of the child or spouse to who, or on whose behalf, support is owed.
In a prosecution hereunder a decree or judgment of a probate court in a proceeding in which the defendant or spouse appeared or was personally served with process, establishing the right of his spouse to live apart or the freedom of such spouse to convey and deal with property, or the right to the custody of the children, shall be admissible and shall be prima facie evidence of such right.
 
ALM GL ch. 273, § 15A:
Child Born Out of Wedlock -- Penalties; Fines; Alternative Sentencing; Restitution.
(1) The penalty for violation of sections one and fifteen of this chapter shall be by fine or by imprisonment or by both fine and imprisonment as specified below.
(2) A person who abandons his spouse or minor child without making reasonable provisions for the support of either or both of them or who is subject to an order or judgment for support pursuant to chapters one hundred and nineteen, two hundred and seven, two hundred and eight, two hundred and nine, two hundred and nine C, two hundred and seventy-three, or two hundred and nine D, or pursuant to similar laws of other states, who, wilfully and while having the financial ability or earning capacity to have complied, fails to comply with that order or judgment, shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than five years or by imprisonment in jail or the house of correction for not more than two and one-half years, or by a fine of not more than five thousand dollars, or by both such fine and imprisonment.
(3) A person who leaves the commonwealth and goes into another state without making reasonable provisions for the support of a spouse or child, or who enters the commonwealth from another state without making reasonable provision for the support of a spouse or child domiciled in another state, shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than ten years or by imprisonment in jail or the house of correction for not more than two and one-half years, or by a fine of not more than ten thousand dollars, or by both such fine and imprisonment.
(4) In a prosecution under this chapter, the court may, upon conviction of the defendant, provide for alternative sentencing including (a) the suspension of the sentence upon and during the compliance by the defendant with any order for the support as already made or as thereafter modified, or (b) notwithstanding the provision of section six of chapter two hundred and seventy-nine, the imprisonment of the defendant only on designated weekends, evenings or holidays, provided, that such defendant retains employment and complies with such support orders.
(5) In a prosecution under this chapter the defendant may be ordered to make restitution to the spouse or the custodial parent or to the person or agency, including the department of public welfare, who is supporting or has supported the spouse or child for all sums expended on behalf of such spouse or child, provided that if the defendant establishes a lesser ability to have provided support, the amount of any liability imposed by this section shall be consistent with the defendant's prior ability to have paid support.